bridgie

Personal density is directly proportional to temporal bandwidth.

theoutersun:

fig. 9 - The earth is a sphere because that is the most perfect mathematical shape and all heavenly bodies are perfect. (Pythagoras, Ancient Greek)

The Outer Sun is an ongoing series illustrating human ideas about the cosmos.

(via elucipher)

libutron:

Assassin Bug eggs
These are not flowers, neither fungi, but eggs of an Assassin bug of the species Sinea spinipes (Hemiptera - Reduviidae), native to the United States and Mexico.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo: ©Kim Fleming
Locality: Abbeville County, South Carolina, US

libutron:

Assassin Bug eggs

These are not flowers, neither fungi, but eggs of an Assassin bug of the species Sinea spinipes (Hemiptera - Reduviidae), native to the United States and Mexico.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo: ©Kim Fleming

Locality: Abbeville County, South Carolina, US

libutron:

The curiosities of the Blue dragon nudibranch
Commonly referred to as the Blue dragon nudibranch, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia - Facelinidae), is a remarkable species of sea slug native to the Indo-Pacific region.
This is an extremely elongate species up to 5cm long, with large, curved arches of cerata (the projections on the upper surfaces of the body) along the length of the body. The cephalic tentacles have two distinctive dark purple (or blue) bands.
Although the body color of this nudibranch is translucent tan, the cerata, which are mostly blue or dark purple, lavender or golden brown, give the nudibranch most of its apparent color.
The Blue dragon nudibranch has many amazing survival strategies. When touched, the nudibranch will “flare” its cerata and the nematocysts will discharge on contact (it is one of the few nudibranchs with a sting strong enough to be felt by humans though usually not in areas with thicker skin such as the palm of the hand).
It is also able to autotomize (lose or detach) the posterior part of its body in order to distract, or free itself from, a potential predator. Later, the missing portion can be regenerated.
Another curiosity of this species is that the cerata contain zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium that exhibit the capacity for photosynthesis, and they grow while reside in the sea slug. This symbiotic relationship with the algae helps the adult nudibranch to overcome a period of food shortage by getting photosynthetic products.
References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]
Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach
Locality: New South Wales, Australia

libutron:

The curiosities of the Blue dragon nudibranch

Commonly referred to as the Blue dragon nudibranch, Pteraeolidia ianthina (Nudibranchia - Facelinidae), is a remarkable species of sea slug native to the Indo-Pacific region.

This is an extremely elongate species up to 5cm long, with large, curved arches of cerata (the projections on the upper surfaces of the body) along the length of the body. The cephalic tentacles have two distinctive dark purple (or blue) bands.

Although the body color of this nudibranch is translucent tan, the cerata, which are mostly blue or dark purple, lavender or golden brown, give the nudibranch most of its apparent color.

The Blue dragon nudibranch has many amazing survival strategies. When touched, the nudibranch will “flare” its cerata and the nematocysts will discharge on contact (it is one of the few nudibranchs with a sting strong enough to be felt by humans though usually not in areas with thicker skin such as the palm of the hand).

It is also able to autotomize (lose or detach) the posterior part of its body in order to distract, or free itself from, a potential predator. Later, the missing portion can be regenerated.

Another curiosity of this species is that the cerata contain zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium that exhibit the capacity for photosynthesis, and they grow while reside in the sea slug. This symbiotic relationship with the algae helps the adult nudibranch to overcome a period of food shortage by getting photosynthetic products.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Sylke Rohrlach

Locality: New South Wales, Australia

#fashion inspiration

heresthatrainyday:

A few pictures from my Golden Guides to show what they’re about. I’ve been reading them since I was a kid and the illustrations always astounded me. They’re so colorful and captivating- and informative as well. The oldest of these date back to 1955!

In order of appearance: Oceanography, Mammals, Reptiles & Amphibians, Birds, Insects, Cacti, Orchids, Flowers, Light & Color, Trees

(via scientificillustration)

#golden guides are the best ever #i have a few collected #takes me straight back to childhood
noctaeris:

Stephen Einchhorn. All rights reserved, please do not remove or alter the caption/credit.
This is Kerið, a volcanic crater lake in the Golden Circle.It is now believed that Kerið was a cone volcano which erupted and emptied its magma reserve. The cone then collapsed into the empty magma chamber due to its weight.

noctaeris:

Stephen Einchhorn. All rights reserved, please do not remove or alter the caption/credit.

This is Kerið, a volcanic crater lake in the Golden Circle.It is now believed that Kerið was a cone volcano which erupted and emptied its magma reserve. The cone then collapsed into the empty magma chamber due to its weight.

(via earthandanimals)

rhamphotheca:

Grand Teton National Park - WY, USA
What’s one of the hardest working mammals in Grand Teton? 
It’s the American pika. Weighing a mere 6 ounces, pikas work all summer collecting grasses and other greens as they prepare for the harsh winter season. They build haypiles on the rocky slopes to allow the grasses to dry out before moving it “indoors” for winter. This strong work ethic is necessary for survival because pikas do not hibernate, unlike other high elevation mammals. One pika can gather up to 50 pounds of tasty greens that will last through those long Teton winters. Have you seen a pika at work?Photo by J. Koeppel

rhamphotheca:

What’s one of the hardest working mammals in Grand Teton?

It’s the American pika. Weighing a mere 6 ounces, pikas work all summer collecting grasses and other greens as they prepare for the harsh winter season. They build haypiles on the rocky slopes to allow the grasses to dry out before moving it “indoors” for winter. This strong work ethic is necessary for survival because pikas do not hibernate, unlike other high elevation mammals. One pika can gather up to 50 pounds of tasty greens that will last through those long Teton winters. Have you seen a pika at work?

Photo by J. Koeppel